WaPo hits climate study whiplash — First, warming caused Sandy, new study says warming to prevent future Sandy

The WaPo reports:

After Superstorm Sandy hit a road block in the atmosphere’s flow over the Atlantic and took a hard left crashing ashore in New Jersey, a rush of stories emerged speculating climate change may have played a role in the unlikely turn.

Now a new study says, not so fast: climate change will make such a move less common, not more.

Read more…

5 thoughts on “WaPo hits climate study whiplash — First, warming caused Sandy, new study says warming to prevent future Sandy”

  1. We have only a vague idea of the earth’s actual average temperature.
    We have only a vague idea about how much the earth has warmed since the Industrial Revolution.
    We have only a vague idea of what warming will do to weather systems.
    We have only vague ideas about what optimal climates would be.
    We have only vague ideas about what warming or cooling will do to extreme weather events.
    We have only vague definitions of what constitutes an extreme weather event, but I’ll allow that a Cat 1 hurricane or a confirmed tornado qualifies.
    We have only vague ideas of how often extreme weather events occur.
    We know that a large part of the increased cost of extreme weather events relates to putting expensive stuff close to high-tide and flood points.
    So with as little as we know, why do we think we know how warming will alter the paths of the rare hurricanes that move north of Georgia?

  2. We also know that Sandy was a weak, late season storm, that made landfall on an unusually high full moon tide. Had is struck six hours earlier/later, it would have just been a weak, late season storm. Not unlike several weak storms that have struck before. Sandy was just plain ordinary. “Superstorm” is warmist hype.

  3. I have to disagree on one point there. Hurricanes and tornados aren’t extreme. At least not in the “unprecedented” or even unusual sense. I’ve spent about half my life in tornado alley (Missouri) and the other half on the south eastern seaboard including coastal North Carolina, Florida, and Louisiana. Every year as far back as I can remember the TV news has overblown any two clouds that spin around eachother. The reality is big storms are business as usual for locations that are used to it. Every year the news crews seek out the worst-off, least-prepared idiot to sell a sob story but it generally isn’t as bad as it’s made out to be. It’s certainly not worse now than it was when I was a kid. Sadly what’s really changed is the attitudes of the people that have shifted from stoic optimism and thankfullness for what they have to victimhood and entitlement.

  4. Howdy GHO5T
    You’re right that tornadoes and hurricanes are periodic events but I grant they are extreme because of the damage and injuries that go in their wake. For that matter, Mississippi flooding is a normal event, which is why we’ve mitigated and adapted along its path.

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