Global literary circles warm to climate fiction

Michael Mann is already really good at this.

The Financial Times reports:

Many of the 70-odd books written up to the late 1990s were science fiction, says Mr Trexler, and tended to treat climate change as one of several problems rather than the main one.

The pattern changed as growing numbers of notable writers began tackling the topic, from Margaret Atwood (Oryx and Crake) to Michael Crichton (State of Fear), Jeanette Winterson (The Stone Gods), Ian McEwan (Solar) and Barbara Kingsolver (Flight Behaviour).

This is in line with growing public concern about the climate, says Mr Trexler. “There’s a slow curve of public awareness of the importance of climate change and an increasing sense that we ought to do something – and why aren’t we?” he said. “So you get important, literary authors doing really interesting work.”

There was a spike in 2008, when more than 40 climate-related books were published in a single year, which he puts down to growing frustration with the George W. Bush presidency. Most of these books would have been written in the US president’s second four-year term, which ended in January 2009.
Cli-fi has a long way to go, however, before it becomes as popular as the bestselling classes of crime, history or romance, say book agents.

2 thoughts on “Global literary circles warm to climate fiction”

  1. State of Fear by Crichton, was that antiman-made global warming? I thought I heard that somewhere.

  2. Darrell, yes, State of Fear was about global warmist true believers who would stop at absolutely nothing to convince ‘the public’ of the dangers of CO2. After failing miserably at doing this with junk science claims, they settle on intentionally creating an environmental and humanitarian catastrophe. It’s a very good book, of the quality one rightly expects of Michael Crichton, and I recommend it highly.

    The book was reviled and denounced by the Green Left, and its author along with it. Which is a far higher recommendation than I could ever give.

Comments are closed.