Claim: U.Va. Researchers’ New Diagnostic Test Can Identify Each Person’s Optimal Salt Intake

“Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have cut through conflicting advice about salt consumption by demonstrating that each person has a “personal salt index,” an upper limit on daily salt consumption for good health. In addition, they have developed a test to determine that level – and to identify people who should consume more salt.”

Read the media release.

4 thoughts on “Claim: U.Va. Researchers’ New Diagnostic Test Can Identify Each Person’s Optimal Salt Intake”

  1. Valuable if true. Relieving most people of concern about their salt intake, guiding those who may be at risk.

  2. This sounds ridiculous on the face of it. Salt intake varies wildly from day to day. Hot days and exercise make you sweat and lose sodium, not so much otherwise. To determine a daily dose from a snapshot test is silly. This is why the organism has feedback systems, to adapt to changing needs.

  3. The ‘optimal salt intake’ is determined easily – if it tastes like salt, you’re getting too much.
    The body’s prime natural mechanism for getting rid of salt is through sweat. Sweat in perspiration serves to inhibit bacteria and fungi on the skin. If you really think you’re getting too much salt, go work up a sweat – every day.

  4. ” The ‘optimal salt intake’ is determined easily – if it tastes like salt, you’re getting too much. ”

    You’re joking, right? That’s about as useful as telling Americans that we’re eating the right amount of food if we feel pretty full/not hungry, and that’s working out real well.

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