Drones can detect people who are armed

“This could violate Fourth Amendment rights as well as Second Amendment rights.”

“The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has customized its Predator drones, originally built for overseas military operations, to carry out at-home surveillance tasks that have civil libertarians worried: identifying civilians carrying guns and tracking their cell phones, government documents show.”

Read more at CNET.

12 thoughts on “Drones can detect people who are armed”

  1. So, seriously, why would I be worried if they saw me with colt 45’s on both hips, or even one?

  2. Nothing wrong with it, if you are a subject and not a citizen.

    It is none of the government’s business whether you are armed.

  3. I have to wonder if people have a ‘reasonable expectation of privacy’ regarding whether what they do is visible from the sky. We’ve had surveillance satellites up there for quite a long time already. It may be too late to invoke the Fourth Amendment.

  4. There are other technologies readily available and in use for locating cellphones just using the network presence signals that all cellphones generate, among them AOA (Angle-or-Arrival) and TOA (Time of Arrival). AOA and ToA are not as precise or as accurate as GPS, but they can work indoors and underground (whereas GPS cannot). Also, offloading to a local Wi-Fi hot-spot can also nail you, unless you have that turned off, too.

  5. my goodness. the infrard sensors can penetrate a house from the outside and determine all kinds of things. to identify a handgun would not be remarkable at all. it would light up if on a hot body.

    John Dale Dunn MD JD Consultant Emergency Services/Peer Review Civilian Faculty, Emergency Medicine Residency Carl R. Darnall Army Med Center Fort Hood, Texas Medical Officer, Sheriff Bobby Grubbs Brown County, Texas 325 784 6697 (h) 642 5073 (c)

  6. I dunno, Biggles, some of the ladies at Cowboy Action Shooting would say holsters help make a body hot. Some of the men would agree. A Schofield on each hip, tooled leather, a plumed hat…
    There is an old common law standard: the eye cannot commit a trespass. Meaning whatever is visible or audible is fair game. I would say that any camera system based on ordinary optics would pass muster but that infrared and enhancements would be less likely to pass muster.
    The location tracking of cell phones has been valuable for rescue and law enforcement work and it’s inherent, as commenters noted, to the operation of the cell phones. (Using it is not inherent, but the possibility is.) The same is true of any radio system, of course. So is the occasional bleed-through of signal so that a call comes through loudly to someone who wasn’t supposed to get it. It’s hard to know how this fits into the Fourth Amendment and fair-minded friends of liberty can reasonably disagree.

  7. My God man !!! We have a real poet on line!!. I’m going to save this. (Might even plagiarise a bit one day. Who knows?)

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