The Horror: Millions of California children still exposed to secondhand smoke

How did all those baby boomers survive?

From a UCLA media release:

2.5 million California children still at risk of secondhand smoke exposure

Despite having the second-lowest smoking rate in the nation, California is still home to nearly 2.5 million children under the age of 12 who are exposed to secondhand smoke, according to a new policy brief from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

Using data from several cycles of the California Health Interview Survey, the study’s authors estimate that 561,000 children are directly exposed to secondhand smoke in the home. Another 1.9 million are at risk because they live in a home where another family member is a smoker, even though smoking may not be allowed in the home itself.

Secondhand smoke exposes children to a greater risk of developing asthma, respiratory infections and countless other ailments. Research shows that children raised by smokers have a greater risk of becoming smokers themselves.

The next frontier in the campaign against smoking is to reduce smoking at home,” said Sue Holtby, the study’s lead author and a senior researcher at the Public Health Institute, which works with the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in conducting the California Health Interview Survey. “California’s fight against tobacco has been a major public health success story, but we still need to spread awareness and ensure that every family knows the dire consequences of addiction.”… [Emphasis added]

Note the highlighted portions. A child is at risk of countless ailments even if not exposed!

8 thoughts on “The Horror: Millions of California children still exposed to secondhand smoke”

  1. I’ve only seen one instance of a pathology report linking a person to actually dying from second hand smoke. One instance? In ALL this time of scaring the hell out of people, only one person clinically died of second hand smoke? What’s the truth here?

  2. Not only was I exposed to second hand smoke from my father for 19 years, I started smoking myself when 17 and continued for about 17 years. i also was exposed to asbestos from brake linings being changed and probably other sources, brake fluids, gasoline including MTBs, numerous solvents from mechanics and farm work, numerous adhesives, glues and paints and all the wonderful stuff in the air around Southern California in the late 60’s and early 70’s… Yup, I must be dead from cancer years ago!!!! My dad who was exposed to magnitudes more of the same stuff managed to live only to the age of 72 with his lifetime alcoholism adding to his issues!!!

    Ya get the idea these guys really don’t understand the systems they make proclamations about?? Epidemiology is apparently the ultimate Junk Science!!!

  3. PS: My mother was exposed to second hand smoke on a daily basis for over 50 years from her father and brothers and my dad!! She is 83 now and shows no signs of any problems from the smoke.

  4. They forgot to add the children who are at risk because they know someone who knows someone who was exposed to second hand smoke.

  5. Not smoking in the home is not the same as no exposure. Smoke sticks to your skin & hair & clothes. One negative example of a relative who smoked or was exposed to smoke with impunity doesn’t invalidate statistics. Babies whose mothers smoke have an 8-fold risk of crib death. Those who are exposed to smoke have a 20-30% higher risk of cancer. Sure, you can say, “lies, damn lies & statistics,” but these respectable scientists aren’t just blowing smoke up your, well, you know. How much research would it take to convince you?

  6. You’re right…Not smoking in the home isn’t the same as no exposure….but when taking into account that about 99% of nonsmokers once had ashtrays in their homes for guests that smoked, plus the fact that smoking was allowed practically everywhere until the early 1990s when anti-tobacco fanatics coined the term, “secondhand smoke,” everyone over the age of 22-23 has been exposed, and if you’re over 40, much more to boot. Tens of millions of Baby Boomers grew up around smoke 24/7/365 and are still healthy today. Anecdotal as that may be, there’s a recurring theme here: it happened tens of millons of times, and anyone possessing the most rudimentary amount of intelligence should realize that this alone trumps any bogus “research” by “experts” who are told to obtain the results that those funding them want to see. In short? Sharing an indoor space with a smoker is about as life-threatening as an earthquake in Pakistan would be to someone standing in a cornfield in Nebraska. Saying that passive smoke harms nonsmokers is akin to saying that if someone eats a red-hot burrito and farts downwind of another person, he or she will get heartburn.

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