DDT saved the lives of many Holocaust survivors

Allied soldiers liberally sprayed survivors to stop the spread of deadly typhus.

Here’s a photo of a Bergen-Belsen survivor being sprayed with DDT by a British soldier.

A British soldiers sprays DDT (to combat insect-born typhus) on a recently liberated female prisoner from the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp while others wait in line behind her, near the towns of Bergen and Calle, Germany, May 1945. (Photo by George Rodger/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
A British soldiers sprays DDT (to combat insect-born typhus) on a recently liberated female prisoner from the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp while others wait in line behind her, near the towns of Bergen and Calle, Germany, May 1945. (Photo by George Rodger/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

Here’s a photo of a Dachau survivor being sprayed.

dachauddt

Another photo from Bergen-Belsen.

46d7c405f8e73bdd8d317494373cab84

2 thoughts on “DDT saved the lives of many Holocaust survivors”

  1. We used to visit my grandmother in Florida, whose house was on the banks of the dammed up Withlacochee River. On a regular basis, the fogging truck would arrive and a fog of white aerosol would drift in the house. I suspect it was DDT. My son-in-law’s German grandmother died of typhus shortly after WWII, leaving his mother a war orphan as his grandfather had been killed in the war. Luckily for all of us, she was adopted by an American military family.

  2. Stunning photographs. I have never see these or heard of this before.

    The EPA would rather you die from typhus (or malaria) rather than let DDT be used. Because DDT “might” be harmful. Typhus and malaria don’t need the word “might”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.