7 thoughts on “Groundwater depletion adding to global sea-level rise”

  1. Well three cheers for real science and technology because with new developments such as Graphlon (various derivations of the word Graphite) the aquifers will give way to very low cost desalination – so if their claim is true then it will be reversed in the next few years!

  2. So, contribution is 0.5 mm in 50 yrs or 0.01 mm per yr? So less than 1% of recent sea level rise of a few mm per year?

  3. So to stop sea level rising all we have to do is sequester desalinized sea water? Just pump it back into the ground?

  4. Melting “ice sheets” contribute to sea level rise? Are not ice sheets afloat? If so, their melting (due to warmer sea water, rather than air) do not raise sea levels – at all. (I am a Naval Architect.)

  5. You’re right about the floating ice, NAB, but land based ice sheets exist too, and the ones on Antarctica are growing, to the extent that they REDUCE sea-level by 0.23mm/yr. Thermal expansion accounts for most of the sea-level rise in tectonically inert areas, as measured by Tide Gauges, and they measure between 1 and 1.5mm/yr.

  6. streuth- ground water depletion –

    “Some areas of Mexico City are rapidly sinking. These areas, such as the central section of the metropolitan area, have fallen as much as 8.5 meters”

    The Mexico City Aquifer has been depleted since the early 1900s. One study showed that from 1986 to 1992 the aquifer lowered anywhere from 6 to 10 meters in heavily pumped areas. This massive depletion of the aquifer has caused multiple problems for Mexico City. One major problem is that severe land subsidence has occurred. Land subsidence occurs when porous formations that once held water collapse, which results in the surface layer settling. This often occurs where cities were built on unconsolidated land such as river deltas or lakebeds. Some areas of Mexico City are rapidly sinking. These areas, such as the central section of the metropolitan area, have fallen as much as 8.5 meters.

    http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz/wormka/

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