How Renewable Portfolio Standards Can Subvert Your Economy

Sally Kaye writes at Huffington Post:

A strange thing happened on our way to a “clean energy” future in the U.S.: we’ve been hijacked by private developers whose primary interest is cashing in on state and federal subsidies and the guaranteed payback of a hefty return on investment, spawned by each state’s need to meet self-imposed renewable portfolio standards (RPS).

Sales propaganda aside, many of these developers could care less if their pet projects lower greenhouse gases or otherwise help the planet; they are simply capitalizing on the potential riches guaranteed by us, the rate and taxpayers.

Hawaii is the poster child for how a stiff RPS can spawn a developer frenzy, especially in the absence of a coherent, community-based energy policy…

Read more…

5 thoughts on “How Renewable Portfolio Standards Can Subvert Your Economy”

  1. “many of these developers could care less if their pet projects lower greenhouse gases or otherwise help the planet”

    So you shouldn’t be able to build a windmill unless your heart is right?

  2. “How Renewable Portfolio Standards Can Subvert Your Economy.” I know! I know! Call on me!
    You can subvert your economy by creating perverse incentives to do expensive things with less value than less costly things! You can divert tax revenues or borrowed money to projects that damage the environment and cost customers more money for less reliable service!
    Then you can tell the poor that the rich utilities are shafting them and you can make the rich and the middle class subsidize the power bills for the poor and still tell the poor what a raw deal the rich people are giving them!
    Am I right? Did I cover it all?

  3. BTW, Hawaii is basically a geothermal heat source with palm trees and gnarly waves. If geothermal energy isn’t working in Hawaii, where could it possibly work?

  4. You left out the bit about the fleets of token alternative fuel vehicles (easy way to claim green investment) driving up the cost of anything that has to be shipped (also known as everything). Then there’s the omnipresent unproductive jobs (environmental compliance consultants or whatever) that are cashing paychecks that could’ve gone to people that actually do something. I’m sure we could think of more, but there’s only so much space on the internet.

Comments are closed.