Bill Clinton: ‘Nobody believes’ greenhouse gas emissions are economically necessary

No doubt that’s why everyone still burns fossil fuels for electricity and transportation.

The Hill reports:

Former President Clinton said Wednesday that confronting climate change and protecting the environment are “going to be the only way to have a sustainable economy” this century.

“That is what the whole 21st century world is going to be about for the next 30 or 40 years,” he said in remarks at a Washington, D.C., ceremony during which the Environmental Protection Agency’s headquarters was officially renamed after the 42nd president…

The former president recalled putting the Kyoto Protocol before the Senate for ratification in 1997. The international climate treaty would have committed the U.S. and other industrialized countries to slash greenhouse gas emissions but exempted big polluters, such as China and India.

The Senate unanimously rejected the treaty, citing concerns about the competitive position of U.S. firms against those in China and India, who wouldn’t need to adhere to the accord.

Much has changed since then, Clinton asserted.

“In the late 90s, everybody believed that you could not get rich, stay rich or grow rich without putting more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere,” he said. “Nobody believes that anymore.”

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3 thoughts on “Bill Clinton: ‘Nobody believes’ greenhouse gas emissions are economically necessary”

  1. Bill is right on this one. Now you can get rich just by donating to Democrats and being a banker or the CEO of some green energy scam company.

  2. There’s a huge difference between greenhouse gases as an economic necessity and greenhouse gases as a proxy for economic health right now.
    First, foremost, always: greenhouse gases from humans don’t drive the climate.
    Second, we need energy rather than carbon dioxide production and we need things like cement, not the carbon dioxide that’s a by-product.
    Finally, if we could get energy and other economic goods without carbon dioxide production, that would be fine with me. But we can’t, nor will we be able to in the foreseeable future. Right now, greenhouse gas production is a proxy for economic well-being and we should be glad to see it rising among the poor countries.

  3. “In the late 90s, everybody believed that you could not get rich, stay rich or grow rich without putting more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere,” he said. “Nobody believes that anymore.”

    Well we know he is a liar.

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