Harvard economist on climate sensitivity to CO2: ‘It is critical to recognize that every link of this chain is full of deep uncertainty that makes it very difficult to answer the question: by how much?’

Martine Weitzman writes on PBS.org:

The key links in the chain connecting increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations to global well-being are the following. Increased CO2 concentrations lead to increased global average temperatures. Increased global average temperatures lead to increased climate changes (and planetary changes, like higher sea levels). Increased climate (and planetary) changes eventually result in increased damages to humans and the planet.

It is critical to recognize that every link of this chain is full of deep uncertainty that makes it very difficult to answer the question: by how much?

Read more at PBS.org.

3 thoughts on “Harvard economist on climate sensitivity to CO2: ‘It is critical to recognize that every link of this chain is full of deep uncertainty that makes it very difficult to answer the question: by how much?’”

  1. I skimmed the link rather than read it thoroughly. With that caveat, how did someone who appears to be so sensible get past Harvard’s rigorous staff screening process? He makes the skeptic case ever so well.

  2. Weitzman does seem to have been among the chorus flogging CO2 as the disaster awaiting us. Nowhere is water vapor addressed, even though it’s concentration is much greater. But if recent years’ cold winters, especially in Europe, were an indication. how soon will Weitzman address “Global Cooliong”?
    If it’s from PBS, the government subsidized fount of “Global Warming” advocacy, perhaps we should consider the source.

  3. Howdy mossrock
    I read it kinda the other way: Weitzmann appears to be highlighting the idea that we don’t know what’s going on and that we know less at each stage in the progression from “earth is warming” to “shut down the energy economy.”

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