Germans try dodging EU automobile CO2 emissions limits

Business Spectator reports:

The loopholes that Germany wants to maximise, known as supercredits, would allow its premium carmakers such as Daimler and BMW to keep producing powerful, relatively high emission cars – provided they also make very low-emission vehicles, such as electric cars.

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4 thoughts on “Germans try dodging EU automobile CO2 emissions limits”

  1. allow its premium carmakers such as Daimler and BMW to keep producing powerful, relatively high emission cars – provided they also make very low-emission vehicles, such as electric cars.

    Then they will sell the nice cars that real people actually want to buy, and they will give the electric cars no one wants to the EU for all those pollies to make their monthly trip between Brussels and Strasbourg…win-win! 🙂

  2. “The new German proposal, seen by Reuters, argues that being able to save supercredits from before 2020 so they can be used later is the only way to ensure no time is lost in getting Europe on the path to highly efficient vehicles.”

    This is a preview of the machinations to come here, caused by Crown Prince Obama’s 54.5 mpg CAFE.

    Car purchasers consider many things when deciding on a car. Things like safety, cargo capacity, performance, number of passenger seat, comfort,
    luxury, and mpg.

    Crown Prince Obama says, “Screw all that. The ONLY consideration is mpg.” Then brags that he will be saving you money because of the great gas mileage you will be getting.

    As the CAFE vice grinds down on the marketplace, many things will happen. What won’t happen is the people’s desire for cars they want, and not what CPO says they can have.

    It is easy to envision a future in which there is a requirement that when you buy your MB SL63 AMG, you must also purchase one of their disposable electric cars. Or MB will price it in to the cost of the AMG. There will be square mile parking lots full of the token electric cars, that people paid for to get the car they really wanted.

    The government interfering with the marketplace will produce more bizarre results.

  3. Since no one wants electric cars the automakers can look at the loophole as sort of a carbon tax to make greenies feel warm and fuzzy inside.

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