Victory: Judge Halts New York City Soda Ban

“A state judge on Monday stopped Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s administration from banning the sale of large sugary drinks at New York City restaurants and other venues, a major defeat for a mayor who has made public-health initiatives a cornerstone of his tenure.”

Read more at the Wall Street Journal.

7 thoughts on “Victory: Judge Halts New York City Soda Ban”

  1. A rare burst of sanity. Now will the voters connect the dots between banning cigarettes in bars — transfats in restaurants — large sodas — tyranical mayor and council? Let us hope.

  2. This ruling is a little late, after all the restaurants have felt the impact of having to re-engineer their menus and purchase new glasses.

  3. How many restaurants serve drinks in 32 oz glasses? Sit-down restaurants use standard 16 oz or 20 oz glasses. Fast food places have super sizes but they already have a “small” size available. I’m wondering how much adapting was necessary?

  4. I’m sure it depends on the restaurant. I know one chain or location had reported ordering a thousand 16-oz glasses. That was probably about a $3k order — hardly the end of the world for a place that buys glasses by the thousand, but an added expense to stave off the nannies rather than a real business decision.

  5. A standard dinner glass is 16 oz. The standard restaurant glass is 20-24 oz to allow for ice and reduce the need for refills (fine dine typically uses 12-16 oz tumblers or 10 oz wine glasses). The limit is 16 oz. All locations serving bottled cokes (ie: New York’s famous stree vendors) had to dispose of all 20-24 oz bottles in their possession, possibly at discounted prices, and purchase 16 oz bottles.

    A small cup at McDonalds is 16 oz, so all larger sizes had to be disposed of.

    There are a lot of back-end costs to these sorts of regulations.

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