5 thoughts on “NYTimes: Fracking blamed for earthquakes in Holland”

  1. The title is a bit misleading, as the sandy soil under most of Holland has sufficient porosity so that Hydrofracturing (fracking) is not needed or used to extract the gas. The Netherlands is slowly sinking for isostatic reasons as the glacial melt of the last Ice Age removes gigatons of weight from Norway, allowing it to rise and The Netherlands to sink. Gas extraction and the “natural” sinking combine to create mini-quakes. Water removal from dike surrounded farmland (polders) is also a factor in the mini-quake process.

  2. If fracking could be shown to trigger earthquakes, it would be the greatest breakthrough in earthquake control imaginable. What makes earthquakes catastrophic is when the DON’T happen for a long time. Then, when the crust finally does slip, we get a big one. If we could trigger a tiny earthquake, say, every Friday at 6pm, there would never be a big one.

  3. The explanation by Frederick Michael is standard plate tectonics as taught at all universities. The big earthquake in Sumatra, Indonesia a few years ago — 8 to 9 on the Richter scale — released several million years of accumulated stress.

  4. Of course fracking can cause earthquakes in the UK near Blackburn Lancashire two years ago there were several earthquakes caused by fracking and the government stopped it for a year while it was being investigated.

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