Economist: ‘Mismatch between rising GHG emissions and not-rising temperatures is among the biggest puzzles in climate science just now’

“… it may be that the climate is responding to higher concentrations of carbon dioxide in ways that had not been properly understood before.”

Read more at the Economist.

4 thoughts on “Economist: ‘Mismatch between rising GHG emissions and not-rising temperatures is among the biggest puzzles in climate science just now’”

  1. If theory and reality don’t match, it is not reality that is wrong. However, that is apparently an insensitive position to take. We must be more egalitarian and let theory and reality have an equal say and meet in the middle. What then does being right mean?

  2. This is just a temporary lapse in the narrative. They need to think this through.

    The IPCC has made clear that the argument from ignorance is a proof, not a fallacy. In short: since we’ve looked at the variables and still don’t know what’s causing this temperature trend, it’s obvious that humans are causing it and must fix it.

    The author needs to realize that what has “not been properly understood” is therefore anthropogenic, and the only work that’s left is to envision an explanation that involves human interference.

  3. Hm. I have the idea that the climate is responding to human GHGs, if at all, with a well-known mechanism known as negative feedback. Thank Providence that the nonlinear multi-forcings seem to dampen each other out and produce a climate system with relatively narrow limits, and those limits are ones in which life has developed very successfully.

Comments are closed.