Activists Ratchet Up ‘Food Addiction’ Campaign

The use of inflammatory words such as “toxic,” “poison,” “manipulation,” “addictive,” and “inherently dangerous” signal the trial lawyers and state attorneys general are coming for the food industry.

Read more at Forbes.

5 thoughts on “Activists Ratchet Up ‘Food Addiction’ Campaign”

  1. I find these crusaders absolutely insulting. I’m literate and informed. I’ll make my own decisions and I’ll leave you to make yours. Deal?
    I was appalled when the tobacco companies caved because I was sure this kind of thing was coming. People like Dr. Oz and Rev. Al won’t legislate a ban at the consumer level; they’ll try to ban at the production level to “protect” me. But the goal is the same.

  2. “food companies are manipulating their products in order to get you addicted to them.”

    Damn right I’m addicted. Sometimes, the first thing I think of when waking up is getting some food.

    If I don’t get some food EVERY DAY, I go through withdrawals. But eating more quickly gets rid of the withdrawal symptoms. I’m trapped.

  3. The article mentions obesity, but doesn’t lay out what the damages are. If the damages are as severe as they think trial lawyers are going to try to make it, why aren’t the obese criminally liable for being obese? Really, if it’s a bad as they make out, put the guy who shoveled it into his mouth in jail.

    For his own good!

    After all, any food that contains calories can be consumed in enough quantity as to make you obese. ALL food has that capacity. Declaring some foods good and some bad is sophistry.

  4. I have no doubt that food companies are adding salt, sugar and fat to make their products more appealing. Salt, sugar and fat work, too, because they taste good. I also have no doubt that we end up getting fatter as a people as a result. (I can’t prove that, but I have no doubt).

    Does all this add up to a tort? I don’t see how. Processed foods list their ingredients in the order of their quantities. They also list their fat, sugar/carb, protein content by percentages. So we all pretty much can see what we’re eating.

    Despite the skepticism here, I believe it will eventually be proved (to an acceptable level of proof — preponderance of the evidence) that carbohydrate rich diets are a major cause of obesity. However, that doesn’t mean food companies will be (or should be) held liable. Nor does it mean [overweight] individuals will be (should be) held liable.

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