Nuclear Notes: Breakers in the Solar Wave

U.S. nukes have a well-deserved chuckle at German solar’s misfortunes.

NEI’s Nuclear Notes writes:

Although Germany has become something of a whipping post on this blog, it’s hard not to look at its energy profile since it decided to close its nuclear facilities and not see something like chaos. But a lot of that chaos is incipient, so there’s time – not a lot, but still some time – to figure out how to proceed.

For Germany, one of those ways has been encouraging the uptake of renewable energy. But now, the plummeting price of solar panels has unleashed a new round of, how shall we put it, chaos.

Germany plans to reduce government subsidies supporting solar power by up to 30 percent within a year because higher-than-expected demand has made the scheme far more costly than authorities initially expected.

At first glance, that seems a boon to the solar business and a vindication of those subsidies – they seeded the market and now the market can proceed on its own. But not so.

German companies producing solar panels, already under pressure from stiff competition from new manufacturers in China, protested against the new cuts. Several thousand employees of about 50 firms in the segment held protest rallies across the country, the German Solar Industry Association said.

Read the entire posting.

4 thoughts on “Nuclear Notes: Breakers in the Solar Wave”

  1. It’s actually simple, if counterintuitive – the cheaper solar panels are to install, the more people do so (so far, so good) and then claim the excessively generous feed-in tariffs from the government (not so good, adds tremendously to the subsidy  scam  scheme’s cost). Hence “the plummeting price of solar panels” … “has made the scheme far more costly than authorities initially expected“.

  2. But now, the plummeting price of solar panels […]
    […] has made the scheme far more costly than authorities initially expected.
    Sorry, don’t get it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.