Collecting rainwater now illegal in many states

“Big Government claims ownership of our water.”

HealthFreedoms.org reports,

… As bizarre as it sounds, laws restricting property owners from “diverting” water that falls on their own homes and land have been on the books for quite some time in many Western states. Only recently, as droughts and renewed interest in water conservation methods have become more common, have individuals and business owners started butting heads with law enforcement over the practice of collecting rainwater for personal use.

Check out this YouTube video of a news report out of Salt Lake City, Utah, about the issue. It’s illegal in Utah to divert rainwater without a valid water right, and Mark Miller of Mark Miller Toyota, found this out the hard way.

After constructing a large rainwater collection system at his new dealership to use for washing new cars, Miller found out that the project was actually an “unlawful diversion of rainwater.” Even though it makes logical conservation sense to collect rainwater for this type of use since rain is scarce in Utah, it’s still considered a violation of water rights which apparently belong exclusively to Utah’s various government bodies.

“Utah’s the second driest state in the nation. Our laws probably ought to catch up with that,” explained Miller in response to the state’s ridiculous rainwater collection ban.

Salt Lake City officials worked out a compromise with Miller and are now permitting him to use “their” rainwater, but the fact that individuals like Miller don’t actually own the rainwater that falls on their property is a true indicator of what little freedom we actually have here in the U.S…

Read the entire HealthFreedoms.org article.

14 thoughts on “Collecting rainwater now illegal in many states”

  1. I live on a second tier about 300′ above the house below me. There is nothing but the rest of the high hill and woods behind and on either side of me. I did however, find it necessary to spend 5,000. to have a cement culvert built to divert the run off AND the wet weather spring water so it would not flood the house below me Then it was necessary to pay 2,500. to have a 75′ tree cut down so it wouldn’t fall down on top of the house below me….all this was on my property. No, the neighbor did not offer to help pay for any cost. No one told me I had to do this but I did it on my own so I wouldn’t get sued if something happened later. It takes a lot out of a fixed income. I had natural gas installed because it will soon be against the law to use my wood burning heating stove and wood cookstove and of course not allowed to catch rain water (I live on the lake, it’s over 500′ deep). My taxes were raised because I improved my property. I didn’t see that coming.

  2. Add your thounow permitting him to use “their” rainwater, but the fact that individuals like Miller don’t actually own the rainwater that falls on their property is a true indicator of what little freedom we actually have here in the U.S…
    wait a minute junkscience. rainwater ain’t water no mo. its colloidal substance full of lethal Escherichia coli, smog, oil, kerosene dumped by jets and ozone destroying vaporised liquids. it ain’t good to be used even in carwash. miller has no argument.

  3. Reblogged this on Liberalism is Trust Fucked with Prudence. Conservatism is Distrust Tainted with Fear and commented:
    Add your thounow permitting him to use “their” rainwater, but the fact that individuals like Miller don’t actually own the rainwater that falls on their property is a true indicator of what little freedom we actually have here in the U.S…
    wait a minute junkscience. rainwater ain’t water no mo. its colloidal substance full of lethal Escherichia coli, smog, oil, kerosene dumped by jets and ozone destroying vaporised liquids. it ain’t good to be used even in carwash. miller has no argument.

  4. I don’t understand why everyone is thinking so far away to comment on the rainwater fals on your property.
    Are we all such slaves to the governments that we simply look past the basic principles here ?

    Unless a government can MAKE IT RAIN, they don’t have any right to tell us what we can or can not do with it.

  5. no really own anything, everything on this planet was here way before we were and people need to realize that ownership is something we as people created and therefore doesnt have true meaning, this world is going to hell and destorying the planet that gave us life. if we died the earth lives, and the earth dies we die.

  6. A technical question. If I build a system to condense water from the air (say as a secondary use from a refrigeration system/AC), who owns the water?

  7. While you may not own the rain falling on your property, you are never-the-less required to control it in such a way that it does not damage your neighbor’s property. You can be held liable if the run-off from your property causes ‘unusual’ erosion to your neighbor’s lawn.

  8. Can’t collect rainwater for drinking, Gov Schweitzer in Monatana needs it for “catch and release fly fishing”.

  9. This has been the law here in CO for as long as I can remember. Every drop of water is promised to someone downstream, even before it falls from the sky or melts in the mountains.

    It’s the norm for us, but it probably sounds weird to people elsewhere.

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