Stanford science reformer Ioannidis exposes himself as incompetent or insincere — take your pick

I’ve always suspected that Stanford University professor John Ioannidis was only posing as a science reformer. His commentary in PLoS against the EPA science transparency rulemaking validates that.

John Ioannidis

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Milloy’s 1994 groundbreaking report on EPA ‘science policy’ and ‘default assumptions’

Now finally available in PDF format, here is my 1994 report on science policy that the Clinton Administration tried to suppress. You can use it to comment on the just proposed EPA science transparency rule.

Continue reading Milloy’s 1994 groundbreaking report on EPA ‘science policy’ and ‘default assumptions’

Guidelines to the Epidemiology of Weak Associations

Here is a 1987 article from the great Ernst Wynder (1922-1999) author of the first large-scale study to link smoking with lung cancer. In the 1987 article, Wynder discusses the problems of drawing causal connections based on weak association epidemiology. Readers of this page know that weak association epidemiology has long been abused by government regulators, especially the EPA (Read “Scare Pollution” for a thorough treatment of this point). That’s why JunkScience.com has petitioned President Trump to issue standards for the use of epidemiology by regulatory agencies. This article is the introductory one to a 1985 workshop on weak associations published in Preventative Medicine in 1987.

JunkScience petitions White House for epidemiology standards

As long as I’ve been involved in federal regulatory issues (since 1990), regulators have used junk epidemiology to justify overregulation. For the first time ever, we have an administration that is committed to stopping overregulation. So JunkScience.com petitioned the Trump administration today to stop the misuse and abuse of epidemiology by issuing epidemiologic standards for federal agencies.

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Study: Smokers in clinical studies who say they’ve quit often haven’t

A great example of differential misclassification bias that was a criticism of the secondhand smoke epidemiology — i.e., smokers pretending they were nonsmokers. Here’s a quantification of the effect.

Continue reading Study: Smokers in clinical studies who say they’ve quit often haven’t