7 thoughts on “Claim: Storms Preview Sea-Rise Damage to California Roads, Cities”

  1. But there seem to always be ample numbers of Henny Pennys and Chicken Lickens who are looking for a reason — or just any excuse — for pushing the panic button and crying out “The sky is falling.”

  2. Just another thing here, in some situations the land itself can actually rise and fall. Its just another idea to be aware of when people notice a new waterline.

  3. Shoreline flooding has always occurred when high tide, heavy surf, and a stiff onshore wind combine to push the water. It’s call a “storm surge”, not Global Warming.

  4. They ask where the money will come from to relocate infrastructure damaged by “rising seas”? (What they really mean is to replace things that were built where they should not have been built in the first place).

    Take all the money spent on global warming research, studies and regulations and use it for reconstruction and we would have all the money we need.

  5. The salt marshes that Hwy 37 run through have always flooded when there are heavy storms. Especially during the extreme high tides in the Winter. Salt Marshes by definition have to be flooded at high tides. North of hwy 37 used to have a large sea salt mining operation that used gravity to fill their evaporation ponds. The flooding happens when there are high flows in the Petaluma river near where it enters the SF Bay. The river is wide & deep enough for ship naviugation as far as Petaluma.

  6. It’s actually not obvious from the plot that there is/isn’t a sea level rise. There is noise on top of what could be a real trend. You’d have to take a running average over, say, 10 year intervals, and even then there will be noise. But there could well be a statistically significant overall rise under the noise…by eye, it looks like there could be an overall (i.e., under the noise) trend upwards…but you’d have to do something quantitative to have more confidence…

  7. Methinks California needs to be a bit more concerned about the cluster of dangerous faults running through the State and long overdue for activity.

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