Trump defends climate skepticism in New York Times meeting

Claims to the contrary are “fake news.” The full transcript is below.

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From the NYTimes:

THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN, opinion columnist: Mr. President-elect, can I ask a question? One of the issues that you actually were very careful not to speak about during the campaign, and haven’t spoken about yet, is one very near and dear to my heart, the whole issue of climate change, the Paris agreement, how you’ll approach it. You own some of the most beautiful links golf courses in the world …

[laughter, cross talk]

TRUMP: [laughing] I read your article. Some will be even better because actually like Doral is a little bit off … so it’ll be perfect. [inaudible] He doesn’t say that. He just says that the ones that are near the water will be gone, but Doral will be in great shape.

[laughter]

FRIEDMAN: But it’s really important to me, and I think to a lot of our readers, to know where you’re going to go with this. I don’t think anyone objects to, you know, doing all forms of energy. But are you going to take America out of the world’s lead of confronting climate change?

TRUMP: I’m looking at it very closely, Tom. I’ll tell you what. I have an open mind to it. We’re going to look very carefully. It’s one issue that’s interesting because there are few things where there’s more division than climate change. You don’t tend to hear this, but there are people on the other side of that issue who are, think, don’t even …

SULZBERGER: We do hear it.

FRIEDMAN: I was on ‘Squawk Box’ with Joe Kernen this morning, so I got an earful of it.

[laughter]

TRUMP: Joe is one of them. But a lot of smart people disagree with you. I have a very open mind. And I’m going to study a lot of the things that happened on it and we’re going to look at it very carefully. But I have an open mind.

SULZBERGER: Well, since we’re living on an island, sir, I want to thank you for having an open mind. We saw what these storms are now doing, right? We’ve seen it personally. Straight up.

FRIEDMAN: But you have an open mind on this?

TRUMP: I do have an open mind. And we’ve had storms always, Arthur.

SULZBERGER: Not like this.

TRUMP: You know the hottest day ever was in 1890-something, 98. You know, you can make lots of cases for different views. I have a totally open mind.

My uncle was for 35 years a professor at M.I.T. He was a great engineer, scientist. He was a great guy. And he was … a long time ago, he had feelings — this was a long time ago — he had feelings on this subject. It’s a very complex subject. I’m not sure anybody is ever going to really know. I know we have, they say they have science on one side but then they also have those horrible emails that were sent between the scientists. Where was that, in Geneva or wherever five years ago? Terrible. Where they got caught, you know, so you see that and you say, what’s this all about. I absolutely have an open mind. I will tell you this: Clean air is vitally important. Clean water, crystal clean water is vitally important. Safety is vitally important.

And you know, you mentioned a lot of the courses. I have some great, great, very successful golf courses. I’ve received so many environmental awards for the way I’ve done, you know. I’ve done a tremendous amount of work where I’ve received tremendous numbers. Sometimes I’ll say I’m actually an environmentalist and people will smile in some cases and other people that know me understand that’s true. Open mind.

JAMES BENNET, editorial page editor: When you say an open mind, you mean you’re just not sure whether human activity causes climate change? Do you think human activity is or isn’t connected?

TRUMP: I think right now … well, I think there is some connectivity. There is some, something. It depends on how much. It also depends on how much it’s going to cost our companies. You have to understand, our companies are noncompetitive right now.

They’re really largely noncompetitive. About four weeks ago, I started adding a certain little sentence into a lot of my speeches, that we’ve lost 70,000 factories since W. Bush. 70,000. When I first looked at the number, I said: ‘That must be a typo. It can’t be 70, you can’t have 70,000, you wouldn’t think you have 70,000 factories here.’ And it wasn’t a typo, it’s right. We’ve lost 70,000 factories.

We’re not a competitive nation with other nations anymore. We have to make ourselves competitive. We’re not competitive for a lot of reasons.

That’s becoming more and more of the reason. Because a lot of these countries that we do business with, they make deals with our president, or whoever, and then they don’t adhere to the deals, you know that. And it’s much less expensive for their companies to produce products. So I’m going to be studying that very hard, and I think I have a very big voice in it. And I think my voice is listened to, especially by people that don’t believe in it. And we’ll let you know.

FRIEDMAN: I’d hate to see Royal Aberdeen underwater.

TRUMP: The North Sea, that could be, that’s a good one, right?

5 thoughts on “Trump defends climate skepticism in New York Times meeting”

  1. A major factor in our producers having difficulty competing for shelf and floor space in their own retail stores is the fact that our 27,000 or so governments tax the bjesus out of goods and services that are produced domestically while goods produced off-shore and imported get a relatively free ride to retail stores.

  2. I agree with Trump’s decision NOT to prosecute Hillary, contingent on her willingness to help end 69 years of betrayal of our government by an alliance of scientists with globalists after nations and national academies of sciences were united on 24 OCT 1945:

    https://jonrappoport.wordpress.com/2016/11/22/trump-wont-prosecute-hillary-politics-in-the-matrix/#comment-191541

    Otherwise, a civilian grand jury should be established to decide if this unholy alliance of scientists with politicians exceeded the boundary of “ALMOST TREASON” by hiding from the public the power controlling human destiny:

    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/10640850/ALMOST_TREASON.pdf

  3. I understand the political need to declare that he has an open mind. He also recognizes that the whole thing is a globalist scam. It is the ‘science is settled’ crowd that has no open minds, and unfortunately still has enough influence that they could cause him trouble is they ever suspect that they cannot pull him over to their side.
    Gullibility is like an infection: after you have fully recovered you can never have it again.

  4. The fact that Trump argued against the establishment is surely the reason why he won the presidency! The newspapers should be taking his line and should also be serious;y questioning what the warmists are saying – much of that which has nothing but emotion driving it.

  5. Journalists will never take seriously those who question the “faith” in human driven global warming/climate change for several reasons.
    First, most journalists have little or no knowledge of science. For them the climate models are reality, in spite of their numerous fatal flaws.
    Second, the solution to global warming/climate change is attractive because it requires massive government action all in the name of the ostensibly altruistic notion of saving the planet, as if the planet, which has survived far worse, needed saving.
    Third, they won’t question because the believe they in the moral superiority of the left and whatever mission it pursued, regardless of the appropriateness of the actual actions taken.
    Finally, as this election has made absolutely clear what many already knew, journalists have decided that aggressive advocacy is more important than reporting.

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