How much algae?

A new report on green fuel says that 30% of our fuel demands if we just converted the untillable land to algae production.  Phys. Orgreports on microalgae research that has the potential of being the next big player in biofuel. The advantage of this source is that it uses untillable land.  Algae has the advantage of being able to produce 2,500 gallons of biofuel per acre per year, much greater than the 48 gal/acre-year for soybeans and 18 gal/acre-year for corn (this excludes the ~450 gal ethanol/acre-year from corn).  The article says that if the untillable land in the US, China and India were converted to algae production 30% of those countries fuel needs could be made from algae.  Sounds like a misunderstanding, but the US has about 1.8 billion acres of untillable land and only 480 million acres of arable land.  So for 30% of our fuel, we cover the US (and India and China) with algae?  The article didn’t mention the amount of water needed.  Fuel from algae isn’t new, but it rarely seems to get past the research stage.

The researchers estimate untillable land in Brazil, Canada, China and the U.S. could be used to produce enough algal biofuel to supplement more than 30 percent of those countries’ fuel consumption.Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-05-algae-biofuel-world-energy-demand.html#jC

The researchers estimate untillable land in Brazil, Canada, China and the U.S. could be used to produce enough algal biofuel to supplement more than 30 percent of those countries’ fuel consumption.Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-05-algae-biofuel-world-energy-demand.html#jCp

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3 responses to “How much algae?

  1. What part of untillable do they not understand?

  2. Where the Duce do you intend to get the water to flood all of that untillable land??? Loan me a few gallons to flood a mountain range, please!!! LOL

  3. Another alternative fuel which has been “five years away from commercial use” for the past 20 years. Like ethanol from cellulose, don’t hold your breath.

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