Claim: Global warming to wipe out 67% of common plant species, 50% of animal species by 2080

This is junk science because…

… it is a naked prediction that is backed by no empirical data. We have previsouly exposed the fact that warmists have no examples of recent climate change causing any extinctions whatsoever.

The media release is below.

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Climate change will cause widespread global-scale loss of common plants and animals

Almost two thirds of common plants and half the animals could see a dramatic decline this century due to climate change – according to research from the University of East Anglia.

Research published today in the journal Nature Climate Change looked at 50,000 globally widespread and common species and found that two thirds of the plants and half of the animals will lose more than half of their climatic range by 2080 if nothing is done to reduce the amount of global warming and slow it down.

This means that geographic ranges of common plants and animals will shrink globally and biodiversity will decline almost everywhere.

Plants, reptiles and particularly amphibians are expected to be at highest risk. Sub-Saharan Africa, Central America, Amazonia and Australia would lose the most species of plants and animals. And a major loss of plant species is projected for North Africa, Central Asia and South-eastern Europe.

But acting quickly to mitigate climate change could reduce losses by 60 per cent and buy an additional 40 years for species to adapt. This is because this mitigation would slow and then stop global temperatures from rising by more than two degrees Celsius relative to pre-industrial times (1765). Without this mitigation, global temperatures could rise by 4 degrees Celsius by 2100.

The study was led by Dr Rachel Warren from UEA’s school of Environmental Sciences and the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. Collaborators include Dr.Jeremy VanDerWal at James Cook University in Australia and Dr Jeff Price, also at UEA’s school of Environmental Sciences and the Tyndall Centre. The research was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

Dr Warren said: “While there has been much research on the effect of climate change on rare and endangered species, little has been known about how an increase in global temperature will affect more common species.

“This broader issue of potential range loss in widespread species is a serious concern as even small declines in these species can significantly disrupt ecosystems.

“Our research predicts that climate change will greatly reduce the diversity of even very common species found in most parts of the world. This loss of global-scale biodiversity would significantly impoverish the biosphere and the ecosystem services it provides.

“We looked at the effect of rising global temperatures, but other symptoms of climate change such as extreme weather events, pests, and diseases mean that our estimates are probably conservative. Animals in particular may decline more as our predictions will be compounded by a loss of food from plants.

“There will also be a knock-on effect for humans because these species are important for things like water and air purification, flood control, nutrient cycling, and eco-tourism.

“The good news is that our research provides crucial new evidence of how swift action to reduce CO2 and other greenhouse gases can prevent the biodiversity loss by reducing the amount of global warming to 2 degrees Celsius rather than 4 degrees. This would also buy time – up to four decades – for plants and animals to adapt to the remaining 2 degrees of climate change.”

The research team quantified the benefits of acting now to mitigate climate change and found that up to 60 per cent of the projected climatic range loss for biodiversity can be avoided.

Dr Warren said: “Prompt and stringent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions globally would reduce these biodiversity losses by 60 per cent if global emissions peak in 2016, or by 40 per cent if emissions peak in 2030, showing that early action is very beneficial. This will both reduce the amount of climate change and also slow climate change down, making it easier for species and humans to adapt.”

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11 responses to “Claim: Global warming to wipe out 67% of common plant species, 50% of animal species by 2080

  1. This came out on Friday but was overshadowed by other acts of public treachery.

    Companies won’t face charges in condor deaths Los Angeles Times
    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service grants exceptions to a wind farm and a building project in harassing or killing the endangered birds.

    Federal wildlife officials took the unprecedented step Friday of telling private companies that they will not be prosecuted for inadvertently harassing or even killing endangered California condors.

    In a decision swiftly condemned by conservationists and wildlife advocates, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said operators of Terra-Gen Power’s wind farm in the Tehachapi Mountains will not be prosecuted if their turbines accidentally kill a condor during the expected 30-year life span of the project.

    Fish and Wildlife also made an exception for the 270,000-acre Tejon Ranch Co., saying that the government will not prosecute if construction of the company’s controversial 5,553-acre development of luxury homes, hotels and golf courses violates the harassment ban in the endangered species law. The exception will last for 50 years. The project is expected to consume 8% of the critical condor habitat in the Tehachapis, about 60 miles north of Los Angeles.

    Fish and Wildlife Director Daniel Ashe said the decision reflects a difficult reality. The threat of prosecution jeopardized the construction of large-scale alternative energy facilities and real estate developments in the wild and windy places preferred by condors.

  2. Fish and Wildlife Director Daniel Ashe said the decision reflects a difficult reality. The threat of prosecution jeopardized the construction of large-scale alternative energy facilities and real estate developments in the wild and windy places preferred by condors.

    Pardon me Steve for the thread jack and other things, but isn’t the treat of prosecution supposed to jeopardized the construction of large-scale alternative energy facilities and real estate developments in the wild and windy places preferred by condors.

    I would figure a pausity of large scale windfarms and rich people’s mansions (build in Southern Californian Canyon Country – right in the line of wild fires) is a sign that the law against killing condors was working. Silly me.

  3. “UEA’s school of Environmental Sciences and the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research.” Two of the most alarmist outfits there are. This report should be treated with the derision it deserves.

  4. I blame the media for peddling the tripe! Thank goodness for this publication for telling it how it is – crap.

  5. The only problem is that the earth hasn’t warmed. Why does the US news media continue to support fraud. Are liberal Democrats Terrorists which includes politicians and the mainstream media? It is time for the states to start charging these Democrat Terrorists with RICO violations. Take Gore’s airplane away! and take Obama’s crown away.

  6. How does one determine if a wind turbine accidentally kills a condor versus doing it on purpose? USFWS has given the wind farms a lot of wiggle room as far as the ESA is concerned.
    It is interesting how these “scientists” have been able to make such damning projections based on short term studies; whatever they may be. How much field data were collected in the formulation of their conclusions? How many species were actually observed in the wild? It seems like many journals are willing to publish any piece of crap as long as it hasn’t been peer reviewed. The more outlandish the conclusions the more acceptable it is.

  7. ‘Dr Warren said: “Prompt and stringent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions globally would reduce these biodiversity losses . . .”‘

    DO WHAT I SAY, OR THE LIZARD GETS IT !!!

  8. This reminds me of some crap of equivalent quality I saw in a journal article last week. The claim, quite clever actually, is that “species are disappearing faster than we can name them.”

    So you see, it’s a nomenclature bottleneck. They really *are* disappearing, *really!*

    And it was peer-reviewed, no less. I’m sure they’ll get a juicy grant to study more about the un-named, un-nameable species.

  9. Coach Springer

    They should try hyping global warming as forcing undesirable adaptations. I can see monkeys flying out of their butts right now. It increases their geographical range.

  10. IVillageIdiot

    1943: Love it….

  11. I reviewed some “scientific” papers on line this afternoon related to the subject topic and one thread was common to all: They start out with the assumption that climate change is causing loss of species. What ever happened to developing a Null hypothesis as part of the scientific research. When the objective starts out assuming X is true then it is inherent that conclusion Y supports X.

    The second glaring observation is computer models are used (surprise) with no field verification. Makes it easier to draw conclusions not supported by facts that contradict the conclusions.

    Now I understand why USFWS thinks it can use satellite photography to map species habitats. The “scientific” community uses all the bells and whistles of modern technology without field verification. It appears now that students can win a PhD, and professors can obtain tenure from the luxury of their AC office and never get dirty or break a sweat. Do these modern day researchers factor in the carbon footprint of the AC in their models?

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