Licensing Naturopaths

Evidence-based medicine is becoming “outdated” and junk science is becoming more widespread than ever in healthcare — including medical guidelines, especially preventive wellness initiatives and public health policies. With poor science behind all too much of even accepted medical practice, the most irrational pseudoscience is no longer easy low-hanging fruit to stop.

Naturopaths are seeking licensure as primary care physicians, with the same scope of practice as primary care medical doctors, in all 50 states, according to a new website: Oppose Naturopathic Licensing. Gaining even limited licensure gives them the opportunity under Obamacare to force insurance reimbursement for their services. Naturopaths are already licensed in Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Utah, Vermont, Washington, and the U.S. Territories of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

Currently eleven more state legislatures have bills introduced which would enable naturopaths to be licensed or to practice medicine.

The Naturopathic Belief System

Naturopathic beliefs — including those of “naturopathic physicians” — are rooted in vitalism, the pre-20th-century assertion that biological processes do not conform to universal physical and chemical principles…

Naturopaths invoke a few simplistic theories to explain the causes of disease. These include the actions of ubiquitous “toxins” (including most pharmaceuticals); widespread food allergies; dietary sugar, fat, and gluten; inadequate vitamin and mineral intake; epidemic candidiasis [yeast]; vertebral misalignments; intestinal “dysbiosis”; imbalances of Qi;  and a few others. To diagnose these entities, naturopaths use an assortment of nonstandard methods, among which are iridology or iris diagnosis, which holds that the entire body is represented on the iris of the eye; applied kinesiology, by which an allergy to a food is detected by placing the food particle in one hand of a patient and observing a resulting weakness in the other; hair analysis for alleged toxins and vitamin and mineral deficiencies; electrodiagnosis, which can purportedly detect parasites and other problems by measuring the skin’s resistance to a tiny electric current; “live cell analysis”; “pulse” and “tongue” diagnosis; and others…

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15 responses to “Licensing Naturopaths

  1. In his book, “Natural Causes”: Death, lies and politics in America’s herbal suppliment industry, Author Dan Hurley shows how not only herbals and suppliments, but the other “Conplimentry” activities that have caused people to come to believe in these methods. Also, Edzard Ernst, in his book, “Trick or Treatment”, shows the facts about “Alternative Medicine”. From chiropractic to homeopathic to naturopathic and more.

  2. Friend of John Galt

    As medical practice becomes politicized (as Obamacare kicks in), science based medicine will take a serious hit. A few years ago Oregon established a public system that runs along side the private healthcare industry. Lengthy set of covered procedures and health care practices was created. Over the years, as various industry pressure groups have intervened, the covered procedures and practices book has added aroma therapy and a multitude of other junk science treatments. Meanwhile many rare, but expensive maladies have fallen from the list to ‘pay for’ the added worthless benefits.

    A few years ago, a woman on the Oregon plan had a super-expensive cancer drug prescribed. The state notified her that it would not pay for the treatment — but would pay for her physician-assisted suicide.

    Almost makes you want to get drunk on homeopathic vodka (also known as plain water).

    • I’ve heard commercials for “raspberry ketones” and a couple of other weight loss products that invoked the name of Dr. Oz. This leads me to wonder if he’s a quack outside of his surgery practice.
      Low-information people seem especially prone to a mix of scientific terminology (“ketones”) and comforting terms (“raspberry”, “all-natural”). There’s a lot to be said for using “conventional” healthcare only when it’s appropriate and some people may well be over-medicated. Still, the descriptions and claims of most “alternative” therapies leave me feeling queasy. E.g. “Quietus”, with “homeopathic” ingredients “traditionally used to provide relief”, and a lot of others.

      • The one advantage to homeopathic, as it has been explained to me, is whatever ingredients are listed are in such trace amounts as to be nonexistent. At least I know what I’m not getting!
        (I do use some products from off-the-wall homeopaths if they serve my needs. I do tell the seller I don’t believe in the homeopathic part–or the energized mouthwash claim either!!)

      • Yes, Dr. Oz, as seen on Oprah, fits the definition of a quack.

  3. quick look at http://www.Quackwatch.com might help separate the wheat from the chaff. This site is by Dr.Steven Barrett, MD.

  4. Why would persons who can basically make any claim they like except for using the world “cure” (it can be implied) want to become part of Federal regulations, HIPAA, malpractice insurance, etc? None of my physicians see Obamacare as a path to riches (none have voiced it anyway–they have voiced other opinions) so I am wondering what the goal with this is.

  5. To find Dr Oz: Jest foller the yeller brick road.

  6. You guys are “sick” but I guess your traditional medicine will keep you sick to the point that you’re not aware of it. I’ve used alternative medicine most of my life and avoided recommended surgeries and drugs for decades. I’ve also helped others use simple techniques to avoid gall bladder surgery and overcome other simple things that medical/pharmaceutical big business have no interest in curing when they can have not only your health but your money. Tell you what – you pay for your own insurance and leave us alone, outside of your “healthcare” system. Get a life…if you can.

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